If it looks like a bubble, walks like a bubble, & talks like a bubble, is it a bubble?

History matters, no less so for your retirement account. Are we in a normal investing environment or is something “not quite right”? The asset bubble doctors are in and will see you now.   Join me for a conversation with Will Quinn, co-author along with John Turner, of the new and highly acclaimed, Boom & Bust: A Global History of Financial Bubbles (2020). The NBN podcast can be accessed here.

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Uninvestable, due to government overreach…

I was alarmed yesterday to see a sitting US senator assume that the Fed Chairman would naturally prohibit banks from paying dividends (or buybacks) under the new administration. The Fed Chair wisely deflected the question and the assertion behind it.  For folks unaware of how the stock market works, and specifically bank accounting, let me say that that was a “doozy” moment. Yes, it is true that the vast majority of quantitative easing and Federal Reserve activity over the past 13 years (since the GFC) has gone into the financial markets rather than the real economy. That is not because …

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No, Virginia, a dividend and a harvested capital gain are not the same……..

12pm Feb 21, 2021 update: Got some thoughtful pushback from KPA on the assertion that selling shares can still be viewed as a business-owner action and contingent variable in the overall assertion. My answers: 1. Investors have the option of taking cash or reinvesting the dividend. There is a very modest cost to doing the latter, but there is a cost, so it drives academics nuts. You could say that the business owner who does not need the cash now is forced to take it and/or incur the minor hassle of dividend reinvest. 2. Clientele effects. People who want dividends …

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Do books and articles about financial bubbles mean we are in a bubble?

I’m reading an excellent new academic account of bubbles in the financial markets by two Irish academics, William Quinn and John Turner, Boom and Bust. Their taxonomy of bubbles involves formally identifying them after the fact, though they believe their explanatory model would help forecast as them as well. Still it raises the question, which we all felt in 1999 and some of us feel in 2021, how one identifies a bubble whilst you are in the midst of it. While I was pondering that notion, the latest from the WSJ‘s Streetwise columnist, James Mackintosh, hit my device, “If it …

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Price discovery, Soviet Russia, and artistry

The elevator pitch to a book editor and movie producer that never happened: “the early 1960s Soviet experiment of loosening price controls would make for a great work of historical fiction and a high-end movie drama.”  No one in their right mind, right? And yet, it did. Francis Spufford’s Red Plenty came out in 2010. It is simply the best Western work of historical fiction about the post-war Soviet period. Spufford is not a trained Soviet specialist, but every professional historian of the Soviet Union secretly (and not so secretly) wants to have written that book. I know of what …

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Defining risk in a high dividend-paying portfolio. It’s not what most people think.

As the manager of a high dividend-paying portfolio, I necessarily take dividend risk. The yields in the portfolio are, as you might expect, much higher than the market’s miserly 1.6%.  Individual securities in the portfolio have had, can have, and will have yields that can be in the high single digit range, and even sometimes low double-digit range.  Very high yields in a low yielding market is admittedly a sign of dividend risk, but not an assurance of it. And that’s what the goal of the enterprise is: to take an appropriate amount of dividend risk in order to maximize …

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Putting S&P 500 Index “dividend growth” in context….

For those of you keeping score, the S&P 500 Index managed to eke out in 2020 a small increase in the index dividend, 0.07%, over 2019. $58.24 went to $58.28. That’s pretty impressive given the economic circumstances and the reality that dividend-focused products had a tough time in 2020 actually collecting their dividends. The economic downturn affected the Old-Economy dividend payers more than the New-Economy work-from-home companies. So bully for the S&P 500 Index. But it is important to put that achievement in context. Growing the dividend off such a low base isn’t really much of an achevement. The S&P …

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The dividend chorus is getting louder. Will it make a difference?

Blackrock is jumping on the dividend bandwagon. According to a recent Bloomberg article, Blackrock is calling for strong dividend payers to benefit in 2021 from the paucity of income generated in the bond market. Their argument is more in regard to fixed income securities than it is versus other equities, but they are still highlighting the attractiveness of higher-dividend paying equities in a yield-starved market. Blackrock joins a lengthening list of market participants and commentators making the same call. Will it make a difference?  Interest rates have been low and declining for years without a major rotation into dividend stocks …

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